MERMAIDS AND UNICORNS

Online exhibition: www.mermaidsandunicorns.net

Release date: Sunday April 9, 2017, 3 pm CET

Curated by: Carlotta Meyer, Benoit Palop and Tina Sauerländer

Not only the physical world exists today. There is an equivalent one that we only perceive with our eyes. Yet this on-screen world is real. Everything is possible there; unicorns and mermaids exist and become part of our lives. But the world in the digital realm is very fragile. At some point in the future, it may no longer be accessible; its devices and hardware will become purely objects. The online exhibition Mermaids & Unicorns examines how today’s artists working in varied media explore the phenomenon of evanescence. They reflect on the pictorial history of vanitas and evanescence, the concept of absence in the visual present or the topic of “digital obsolescence” in today’s post-digital living conditions.

Full exhibition text at www.mermaidsandunicorns.net

Participating artists: Anthony Antonellis, Katharina Arndt, Kim Asendorf, LaTurbo Avedon, Domenico Barra, Aram Bartholl, Alexandra Baumgartner, Aviv Benn, Jonas Blume, John Breed, Gaby Cepeda, Gregory Chatonsky, Monica Cook, Shyra De Souza, Paula Doepfner, Grigori Dor, Mark Dorf, Rose Eken, Ornella Fieres, Katherine Frazer, Bea Fremderman, Carla Gannis, Emilie Gervais, Hobbes Ginsberg, Andreas Greiner & Armin Keplinger, Karolina Halatek, Claudia Hart, Gregor Hildebrandt, Faith Holland, Hideyuki Ishibashi, Everett Kane, Erica Lapadat-Janzen, Geoffrey Lillemon, Gretta Louw, LoVid & Douglas Repetto, Alexandre Madureira, Claudia Maté, Michal Martychowiec, Rosa Menkman, Eva Papamargariti, Sabrina Ratté, Kent Rogowski, Manuel Roßner, Cecilia Salama, Alfredo Salazar-Caro, Nicolas Sassoon, Ann Schomburg, Robert Seidel, Berndnaut Smilde, Charlie Stein, Mathieu St.Pierre, Katie Torn and Miriam Vlaming

Screenshots of the online exhibition:


OUR CITIES SURROUNDED

Online exhibition: www.newhive.com/peertospace/ourcitiessurrounded

Release date: Sunday July 31, 2016, 3 pm CET

Curated by: Carlotta Meyer and Tina Sauerländer

The online exhibition Our Cities Surrounded reveals residential areas around the globe—from America to Asia, Europe to Africa or the Middle East. 42 artists from 21 countries photographed in 19 states both home and abroad to give an insight into global human living conditions and their specific local history. Our Cities Surrounded follows peer to space’s IRL group exhibition Sometimes You See Your City Differently. This online exhibition now extends the original concept in terms of diversity and scale, facilitating the inclusion of many more artists as well as infinite access thanks to the Internet.

Our history shapes our present. We are all involuntarily born into a certain culture, a certain region, a certain city somewhere in this world, that in turn shapes our own perception of our surroundings, foreign cultures and the world itself. We are all responsible for making ourselves aware of this fact in order to treat each other with respect, empathy and humanity. Clearly this demands a huge amount of self-reflection and change of perspective from each of us, especially when we encounter “the other” on the streets of our neighborhoods, abroad on our holidays, on the Internet, somewhere in this world, physically or virtually. Our Cities Surrounded contextualizes our own living space within the one of the others around the globe. Differences and similarities become visible proving that we are all somehow linked together. The urban street scenes away from public buildings and tourist sites reveal the inhabitant’s daily surroundings. Without any individuals the images speak generally about human living conditions and their cultural or country-specific manifestations. Buildings last over generations. Therefore they symbolize and witness societal values or a certain aesthetic sense. Both change or decline over time. Edifices decay with it, are abandoned, destroyed or become ruins, or they get reshaped or restored. Our Cities Surrounded speaks about this change, that may have been brutally forced by authorities or happened barely noticeably and slowly over time.

Participating artists: Taysir Batniji, Bogdan Andrei Boreianu, Malte Brandenburg, Hannah Darabi, Marlon de Azambuja, Donato del Giudice, Lorena Endara, Gerrit Engel, Katharina Fitz, Faten Gaddes, Jennifer Garza-Cuen, Florian Generotzky, Otto Hainzl, Robert Harding Pittman, Matthias Hoch, Jordi Huisman, Rohan Hutchinson, Nicu Ilfoveanu, Gerry Johansson, Urte Kaunas, Yasutaka Kojima, Dillon Marsh, Bernhard Moosbauer, Huma Mulji, Mame-Diarra Niang, Hirohito Nomoto, Hildegard Ochse, Yu Ogata & Ichiro Ogata Ono, Mikula Platz, Gabriele Rossi, Katharina Roters, Jörg Rubbert, Eli Singalovski, Silvia Sinha, Rainer Sioda, Jan Vranovsky, Sinta Werner, Michael Wolf, Yoshie Atsushi, Kyler Zeleny, Harf Zimmermann

Screenshots of the online exhibition:


CAT HEROICUS SUBLIMIS

Online exhibition: www.newhive.com/peertospace/catheroicussublimis

Release date: Sunday June 4, 2016, 3 pm CET

Curated by Tina Sauerländer & Peggy Schoenegge  

Cat Heroicus Sublimis explores how digital artists use abstract visual language. The title refers to Barnett Newman’s painting Vir Heroicus Sublimis (1950-51) at MoMA. Newman hoped that the viewer would stand close to this expansive abstract work to experience a physical human encounter, which is part of his definition of the sublime as a “self evident reality” that comes “out of ourselves, out of our own feelings” and “can be understood by anyone” (see here and here). Abstract Expressionist artists like Newman escaped traditional patterns and aesthetics to create their own understanding of the sublime.  Now that we are living in the Digital Age, Cat Heroicus Sublimis gathers works by 48 artists who reflect the ideas and ideals of digital abstract art. Cat Heroicus Sublimis  presents their new media-related ways of abstraction and questions if this could be a way to find a contemporary  sublime. Is there even a need of a sublime in the digital space? How could it be created? Cat Heroicus Sublimis follows peer to space’s IRL group exhibition WHEN THE CAT’S AWAY, ABSTRACTION curated by Tina Sauerländer at Anna Jill Lüpertz Gallery in Berlin. The show explores artistic works that reveal the merge of the real and virtual world with abstract visual language and innovative materials.

Participating Artists: Helena Acosta, Alma Alloro, Maggy Almao, Anthony Antonellis, Kim Asendorf, LaTurbo Avedon, Domenico Barra, Uğur Engin Deniz, Mark Dorf, César Escudero Andaluz, Dor Even-Chen, Ole Fach, Ornella Fieres, Katherine Frazer, Carla Gannis, Sara Goodman, Claudia Hart, Philip Hausmeier, Paul Hertz, Faith Holland, Mark Klink, Erica Lapadat-Janzen & Sophia Borowska, Gretta Louw, LoVid, Vince Mckelvie, Rosa Menkman, Lorna Mills, Brenna Murphy, Zach Nader, Od Niwr, Eva Papamargariti, Will Pappenheimer, Michael Pelletier, Niko Princen, Casey Reas, Antonio Roberts, Rachel Rossin, Cecilia Salama, Nicolas Sassoon, Robert Seidel, Yoshi Sodeoka, Anne Spalter, Mathieu St-Pierre, Phillip Stearns, Daniel Temkin, Giselle Zatonyl, Erik Zepka, Damon Zucconi

Screenshots of the online exhibition:


NARGIFSUS | ANIMATED SELF-PORTRAITS

Online exhibition: www.newhive.com/peertospace/nargifsus

Release date: Sunday March 20, 2016, 6 pm CET

Curated by Carla Gannis and Tina Sauerländer

For NARGIFSUS artist Carla Gannis and curator Tina Sauerlaender invited 58 international artists to present animated GIF Selfie-Self Portraits that provide a broad range of artistic perspectives on contemporary selfie culture and self-display. This online exhibition (released March 20, 2016) follows the NARGIFSUS SCREENING at TRANSFER Gallery, Brooklyn, New York, on the occasion of the closing event of Carla Gannis's solo show A Subject Self-Defined on March 19, 2016. The Selfie Drawings by Carla Gannis, which are the prelude to the works in the show at TRANSFER, were part of the group show Porn to Pizza - Domestic Cliches curated by Tina Sauerlaender at DAM Gallery in Berlin in 2015. The topic of the exhibition, the change of private and personal comfort zones in the Digital Age, complements Gannis's The Selfie Drawings that deal with contemporary states of analog-virtual hybridity and identity performance.

Participating Artists: Alfredo Salazar-Caro, Angela Washko, Ann Hirsch, Ann Schomburg, Anna Frants, Anthony Antonellis, Antonio Roberts, Carla Gannis, Cecilia Salama, Christian Petersen, Claudia Hart, Domenico Barra, Elena Garnelo, Emilie Gervais, Emilio Vavarella, Erica Lapdat Janzen, Erik Zepka, Eva Papamargariti, Everett Kane, Faith Holland, Federico Solmi, Gaby Cepeda, Giselle Zatonyl, Gretta Louw, Guido Segni, Helena Acosta, Jacky Connolly, Jennifer Chan, Jonny Star, Joshua Weibley, Katie Torn, LaTurbo Avedon, Laurence Gartel, Leah Schrager, Lisa Levy, Lorna Mills, LoVid & Dia, Man Bartlett, Mark Dorf, Mathieu St-Pierre, Michael Mallis, Nicholas O'Brien, Niko Princen, Ole Fach, Patrick Lichty, Paul Hertz, Rafia Santana, Ray Tee, Rollin Leonard, Savannah Spirit, Shamus Clisset, Shayna Hawkins, Stefano W. Pasquini, Sung-Ah Jun, Susan Silas, Vince McKelvie, Will Pappenheimer, Yuliya Lanina

Screenshots of the online exhibition: